DQII #5: Exploring Alefgard

We have a ship! The world is now ours to explore.

The music that plays when you’re on the ship makes me feel like you’re dancing across the water. Unfortunately, the reality is more like you leisurely chug along because, unlike Final Fantasy, you don’t travel any faster on the boat. However, you can dock it anywhere you can access land and it’ll magically follow you when you cast Return.1

Since these are royal children we explore in baby steps and sail not even an entire screen away to Alefgard.

Tantegel Castle was changed slightly from the NES version in the DQI remake. This particular remake sticks closer to the original, though. I’ve no idea why that is. Anyway, a hundred years have altered things a bit and the town of Brecconary has been folded into the castle. On the west side are the usual shops and inn.

It’s not much more to go on than we had before, but at least we know there is some indication of where the sunken treasure lies.

Of course, I already know where the spot is, which is very handy because it wasn’t very easy to spot in the remake. Though, to be fair it does actually sparkle in this version.

Back in Lianport, the man will gives us the Echoing Flute in exchange for the ship’s treasures. Because there’s no context, we can safely assume it’s important.

DQII193

The Alefgard area is definitely the best grinding spot at this point. The enemies aren’t too tough and they give decent experience and gold. There’s a save point inside the castle. And, just like in DQI, there’s a man here who will restore your magic so you don’t have to bother with an inn!

My priority at this point is to get the available upgrades from the weapon shop. I don’t bother with Roto’s equipment because (a.) I’ll be finding a new weapon soon and (b.) I got an iron helmet as a random drop.

Sailing from Tantegel Castle to Charlock Castle

After I finish grinding, we sail the short distance south to Charlock Castle.

The first floor of Charlock Castle is in ruins

Inside, Charlock looks like the first ten minutes of Flip This House. As you might expect the castle is crawling with enemies. They aren’t endgame hard this time, but they are still pretty tough for my party at this point.

The lower levels have a layout similar to that of the previous game right down to the chest with Erdrick’s Sword. How it ended up back here is anybody’s guess. After nabbing the sword I warp out to heal and save.

On my return trip I head to the bottom floor where the Dragonlord’s great-grandson is faithfully imitating his ancestor by doing a whole lot of nothing. He tells us about the five crests we will need to collect to receive the power needed to defeat Hargon. In other words: time for a fetch quest.

Map of the world

Behind a barrier on the west side of the bottom floor are a bunch of chests. There’s really nothing too important in there, though, one does have a world map. Inventory space is at a premium so I’ll toss it in the vault at the next opportunity.

Group of seven metal slimes

Back outside I head east across what I presume to be the Rainbow Bridge and run into a group of metal slimes. They beat me up quite thoroughly before all running off. What do you bet I won’t be able to find any once I have the ability to actually hit them?

The Holy Monolith is at the southern tip of this island and, proving it’s just the Southern Shrine with a cooler name, inside is a guy demanding to see Erdrick’s Token. He isn’t very friendly, but at least he doesn’t throw us out of the monolith.

  1. You can also retrieve the boat from inside Lianport where it will inexplicably always be docked.

Comments

  1. I played this one after DQ3, and was disappointed that there were so few places from the first game you could visit. I guess that’s more or less what happened with the original over world in Zelda 2 as well.

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